Ring Pairing: A Detailed Guide for Finding the Perfect Wedding Band for Your Engagement Ring

November 02, 2019 5 min read

Ring Pairing: A Detailed Guide for Finding the Perfect Wedding Band for Your Engagement Ring

With the wide range of ring styles available to you, how can you even begin to choose the best wedding and engagement ring pairing for you?


At Aurora Designer, we field questions every day on how to match a particular style of engagement ring to a wedding band. There is no real “guide” that you receive in life that tells you everything you need to know when making a ring purchase. That is exactly why we have taken it upon ourselves to create one of our own! Gaining a clearer understanding of the way rings pair best together is a great way to ensure that you will be happy with the end result of such a significant purchase.

 

Types of Engagement Rings

There are several types of engagement rings to choose from when you begin shopping for your big moment! Not only do engagement rings differ in stone type, size, and color - but they also differ in setting type, height, width, and shape. For simplicity’s sake, we will categorize these ring styles as the classic solitaire engagement rings, raised solitaire engagement rings, and uniquely shaped engagement rings.

 

I. Classic Solitaire Engagement Ring

 

By far the most popular style, thesolitaire engagement ringcan be set in two ways. The first is the classic solitaire engagement ring, which does not allow a straight wedding band to stack flush. This is due to the basket or base touching the finger and protruding from the band, creating a “bump” from the straight band.

 

In this case, astraight wedding band will not stack flush. A curved or open end band will work best, as these styles will go around the “bump” and allow the bands to stack flush.

 

II. Raised Solitaire Engagement Ring

 

The second type of solitaire ring is the raised solitaire engagement ring. With this type of ring, the inner shank (band) is unobstructed. The setting is raised off of the finger enough that a straight band will stack perfectly!

 

In this case, you must make sure that the engagement ring is raised high enough to accommodate the wedding band. The clearance under the raised setting should be greater than the thickness (height) of the wedding band. For example, if your desired wedding band is 2mm thick, there should be a clearance of at least 2mm beneath the raised setting of your engagement ring.

 

III. Low Profile and Other Unique Engagement Rings

 

The way a low-profile engagement ring is crafted ensures that the entire ring (the band as well as the ring head) touches and lays low on the finger. This means that the basket (or base) on which the stone is set is sitting directly on the finger as well. This kind of ring will not pair or stack flush with your typical, straight wedding band.

The best pairing for a low profile engagement ring would be a curved (contoured) band or an open-end band. These types of bands allow room for the low-profile base and will allow the rings to nest more perfectly together.

 

In the case of a geometric engagement ring, a 3-stone engagement ring, or another unique engagement ring shape, straight bands will generally not stack well. Your best bet would be to create a custom wedding band to ensure the perfect fit, unique to you!

 

 

Types of Wedding Bands

Wedding bands are a symbol of love and an eternal bond. Understandably, you will want this ring to compliment to your beautiful engagement ring perfectly. The three most popular wedding bands that we carry are straight bands, curved (contoured) bands, and open-end bands.

 

I. Straight Wedding Bands

 

Straight wedding bands are the most common wedding band. They pair best with a raised solitaire ring.

 

If you prefer a flush and closely stacked look for your ring set, you should choose a straight wedding band that has a similar width and thickness to the shank (band) of your engagement ring.

For example, if the shank of your engagement ring is 2mm wide and 1.5mm thick, wedding bands of a similar width and height will work best. For those who are particular about closely stacked rings, it is generally acceptable to have a variance of 0.1mm in width and up to 0.2mm in the thickness of the bands. The more similar the bands are, the better they will stack and fit together on the finger!

 

II. Curved (Contoured) Wedding Band

 

Curved wedding bands are contoured to fit the setting of the engagement ring. Many people searching for a curved band are nervous that the band won’t stack or fit well enough with their engagement ring. To avoid this happening, always be sure to measure the diameter of the setting on the engagement ring.

That being said, there are two kinds of curved or contoured wedding bands. The first is a soft or slight curved wedding band, which can work with a solitaire (single stone) ring that has a base that sticks out ever-so-slightly.

 

The second type of contoured wedding band is a large curve wedding band. These wedding bands work well with a large stone or a uniquely shaped engagement ring, such as a hexagon-shaped stone or setting. To better guide our customers through the process of matching an engagement ring to a curved band, we provide detailed measurements in our listings for all of our curved wedding bands.

 

 

We will have another article to discuss in detail how to measure your engagement ring and tips on how to create a custom wedding band for a perfect fit with your unique engagement ring.

Bonus:  Another great use for a large curve band is to stack with a small curve band over a solitaire (single stone) ring to create a dramatic and unique ring stack!

 

III. Open-End Wedding Band

 

An open-end wedding band has a gap in the center of the band in order to fit the engagement setting snugly between the opening. It will go over anything that sticks out as long as you ensure that the gap is wide enough for the setting of your engagement ring.

 

Open-end wedding bands can be stretched to become more open or squeezed closer together to fit an engagement ring. This should be done carefully and very, very slightly so you don’t misshape or damage the ring. It is important to measure the overall width of your engagement ring, so you know how much of a gap is needed in the open-end wedding bands. All of our open-end rings can be customized to have a narrower or wider gap, simply by leaving a note for us when you place your order.

 

Bonus: Open-end rings are also great as spacer rings! If your current engagement ring set does not stack flush or you need a simple gold ring to sit between two rings, it’s easy to use an open-end ring for this purpose. It will easily fit over a small “bump” and help minimize gaps in a stack.

 

 

 In Conclusion

The process of ring pairing can seem complicated, but information is key to deciding what will work best for you and your desired style. Pairing a straight, curved, or open-end wedding band with your stunning engagement ring does not need to be an overwhelming experience. We hope this article helps you on the way to finding your perfect pair.

For more unique or low-profile engagement rings, we do offer a customization process here at Aurora Designer which will ensure your engagement ring and wedding band will be a great match. We have an additional article coming soon to offer more clarity on how to measure engagement rings -- and how to create a custom wedding band that fits perfectly!


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